Yurok

Food

The Yurok Indians eat 500 pounds of acorns a lifetime and hunt a lot of quick animals. The women and children are the ones who go out and pick berries for their family while the dads hunt.

Transport
Yurok_canoe.jpg
Yurok Canoe
ation

This tribe's only methods of transportation was by foot and canoe.
They did not have horses until the Europeans brought horses much later.

Natural Resources

The Yurok tribe hunts deer, fish, elk, birds, and use them as much of them as they can. They cooked them by tying them to a large stick above the fire.

Shelter

The Yurok tribe was very good at shredding trees and using them only when they have fallen, and making homes out of them. The thatched huts that are made out of bundled grass and waterproof elk skins are home to the Yurok Indians. They're very good at conserving trees, and carving planks to form shelter.

Clothing

They made most of their clothing out of animal skin. Their most famous clothing is made out of fox and deer skin.

Climate
The Pacific Ocean affects the the northern coastal region's climate. The ocean keeps the climate warm in the winter and cold in the summer.

Economy
The Northern Coastal Yurok tribe lived along the Klamath River by the Pacific Ocean.

Vegetation
Women gathered acorns and grounded them. During the growing season, wild berries were gathered and eaten fresh or sun dried. Then were pounded into flour to make bread. After that, they were moistened with water to make dough that could be stored for winter.

Culture
Tribal members had strong beliefs in the power gods or sprits that they honor. Each tribe was different, though all were careful to obey the spirits and always do what they were told.






Miwok


Food

The Miwoks eat deer, elk, bears, birds, acorns, acorn mush, mule deer, honey from wild honey bees, berries,seeds from wild flowers for bread, pepper nuts for spice relish, and fish.

Shelter

For shelter the Miwoks had tipi-like structures called "Kowal Katcha." Some houses were made out of red wood tree bark. there was more than one family in a house. the houses sometimes looked like up-side-down ice cream cones. some frame work was made out of poles.
They also had sweat lodges, some were for men only and others were for both genders. the men sweat all the odors off in the sweat lodges so that whan they hunted, the animals couldn't smell them.
Miwoks had sweat lodges that held aunts, uncles, mothers, fathers, and children.


Clothing

The Miwoks wear leather, reeds, breech cloth, bird feathers,deer hide, and tule reeds.

Culture

In the Miwok culture they held dances all year round to celebrate the capture of the deer, salmon or bear, and lots of other reasons.
The Miwoks spoke there own coastal Miwok language. They did not make pottery, fabric, did not plant seeds and had no domesticated animals. Instead they hunted.
they used antlers, and bones were used for instruments.

Transportation

The Miwoks Travel by horse, canoe, and by foot.


Ohlone


Food

The Ohlones ate different kinds of food. The Ohlone ate buffalo. They also ate wild strawberries, wild carrots, and wild mushrooms. They would also catch fish, shellfish, and clams. While the women were picking, the men were hunting. The Ohlone spears were for smaller animals. Acorns were the most important food in their diet. The bows were made of yew for hunting. They hunted geese, dove, quail, rabbits, deer, and antelope for food. Some families boiled acorns for thick porridge or bread. The Ohlones ate a lot of food.


Clothing

The Ohlone tribe wore many different clothing. The Ohlone tribe wore beads, buffalo skin, indian head dresses. The Ohlone tribe use tool reeds for most of their clothing. Willow branches and fiber were also commonly used. They used many colors, mostly bright such as yellow, red, orange, and pink were worn for ceremonies. They wore simple clothing in the summer and animal skin in the winter. Necklaces were made by rock, beads, and abalone shells were often worn. The Ohlones had a lot of different materials to make clothes.


Ohlone_shelter.jpg
Ohlone Shelter
Shelter

The Ohlone tribe had many different types of houses. The Ohlone houses are made up of willow frames covered in branches. The houses were built to last all season. They have low ceilings and the door was so small they had to crawl. The Ohlone tribe had lots of ways to make houses.


Economy

The Ohlone tribe had different kinds of economy ways. Many indians trade for stuff that they don't have so they can survive. The Ohlone tribe has many shells because they live near a river. The Ohlone tribe will trade for something they need. The Ohlones had so many economy cultures.


Transportation

The Ohlone tribe transported in many ways. The Ohlone tribe traveled on waterways such as lakes, rivers, streams, and ocean waters near their territories. These waterways flowed into one another and eventually emptied into the Pacific Ocean. The Ohlone tribe used canoes, log rafts, and balsa's. The Ohlone tribe used many things for transportation.


Culture

The Ohlone tribe celebrated culture in many ways. The Ohlones danced a lot and they make lots of baskets. They celebrate birthdays by having ceremonies and then roast buffalo over the fire. The Ohlones have a lot of culture.




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Pomo

Food
The Pomo Indians ate barnacles, sea mammals, anemones, some seaweed, chitons, snails, crabs, and mussels. Some of their fresh water prey includes crappies, catfish, bullhead, bass, perch, and salmon. They also eat acorns, nuts, and berries.

Clothing
Pomo women wore skirts made out of marsh reeds. Most Pomo men did not wear anything. Only some Pomo men were allowed to wear clothes. No dress was made without one bead. Most men that the Pomo thought had power were allowed to wear headdresses.

Economy
The Pomo Indians made currency from: clamshells, magnisite, arrowheads, bows, blades, beads, salt, obsidian, tools, basket material, skins, food, belts, and robes.

Culture
There are seven different Pomo subgroups. Each group speaks a different language. Pomos called a ceremony haikil when the dancing continued for several days. Usually men would make colorful costumes for both men and women. Dancer costumes were decorated with beads and many colorful feathers. They also wore headbands with a type of woodpecker feathers (flicker). Pomo people would sing lots of different songs such as: love songs, lullabies, hunting songs, gambling songs, and religious songs. For instruments they made flutes, whistles, clapper sticks, and drums. They are also well known for their beautiful baskets.

Shelter
Some of these Indians built their villages along the coast of California. Others of this group lived inland. The Pomo used some of these materials for building shelter: wooden frame with bark; wooden frame with brush, grass, or other plant material. Most Pomo villages were built along the ocean, Clear Lake, and Russian River. Even the people that lived along the coast preferred to have their settlements by a river or creek, and a couple of miles away from the ocean. The Pomo built different types of houses depending on where they were living. In each community has a small, round house that was built over a hole in the ground. This was called a sweathouse. Men used this to sleep under. The sweathouse looked like a grassy hill, because of the grass and the brush they made them with. Pomo used large buildings, that were about 70 feet in diameter, for cerimonies and dancing.

Transportation
The Pomo tribe travels by foot and canoes made of straw, wood, and mud. Awesome as they are, they were delicate and the Pomo did not ride them when the water was rough.
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